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Short Video Viewing & Obesity
Lifestyle & Wellness

Short Video Viewing & Obesity

While previous studies have associated sedentary time (ST) and overweightness/obesity, the type of sedentary behavior is still unclear. Nowadays, short video viewing is one of the more popular leisure sedentary behavior. However, the association between short video viewing and overweightness/obesity remains to be determined. 

A recently published cross-sectional study on 1105 older women aged 60-70 years examined the associations between short video viewing and overweightness/obesity in Chinese community-dwelling older women.[1] It reported that a higher short video viewing time was associated with a higher body mass index. Interestingly, when compared with non-food short videos, short food videos had a greater effect on overweightness/obesity.[1] The authors suggested that a reduction in short video viewing, especially the food category, might be an effective way to prevent overweightness/obesity when incorporated in future public health policy.[1]

On reflection, I am spending significant sedentary hours watching YouTube and TikTok videos. I may need to moderate my sedentary activity and level. A timely reminder. 

 

[1] Chen, Ke, He, Qiang, Pan, Yang, Kumagai, Shuzo, Chen, Si & Zhang, Xianliang. 2022. Short Video Viewing, and Not Sedentary Time, Is Associated with Overweightness/Obesity among Chinese Women. Nutrients 14: 1309. 

 

Posted by Dr. Loke Wai Mun